Prof Sören Nylin

Affiliations:
Email: soren.nylin@zoologi.su.se
Phone: +46 8 16 40 33
Address: Stockholm University, Department of Zoology: Ecology, Svante Arrheniusväg 18 B, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden


Description

I was born in Sundsvall, Sweden, in 1959. I moved to Stockholm in 1979 to study Biology at Stockholm University. I graduated (equivalent to MSc) in Science Education in 1985 and in Biology in 1986. I then became a PhD student at the Department of Zoology under the supervision of Christer Wiklund, and in 1991 I presented my thesis Butterfly Life History Adaptations in Seasonal Environments. Later the same year I received a research grant from the Swedish Research Council (then NFR) and could create a temporary Assistant Professor position for myself. In 1993 I earned the title of Docent, in 1998 I received a permanent Lecturer/Associate Professor position, and in 2002 I was promoted to Professor. In 2005 I became Vice Head of the Department of Zoology, and 2008-2013 I acted as Head of Department. Since 2014 I am Section Dean for Biology.

During the period 1988-1995 I did extensive undergraduate teaching, including several course leaderships in e.g. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and organization of several new courses. Between 1995 and 2007 I acted as coordinator for PhD student courses in Ecology, Ethology and Evolution, appointed by the Section of Biology, and 2003-2007 also as leader of the Research School "Ecology, Biodiversity and the Environment". For this reason I did most of my teaching 1996-2007 at the PhD level (Introduction to research studies, Writing scientific papers, Philosophy of Science, Evolutionary Biology etc). I still give lectures and courses on the practical and philosophical aspects of Science. I have supervised eight finished PhD students (Karl Gotthard 1993-1999, Niklas Janz 1993-1999, Anders Bergström 1999-2005, Georg H. Nygren 2000-2005, Elisabet Weingartner 2001-2008, Dan Wilhelmsson 2003-2009, Matthias H. Andersson 2008-2011, Lina Söderlind 2007-2012) and have hosted several post docs, including Jack Windig, Niklas Wahlberg and Ulassa Kodandaramaiah.

I was a member of the Editorial Board for Ecology 2001-2004, member of the Council of the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) 2005-2009, International Vice President of the Lepidopterist's Society 2009-2010 and currently Editorial Board Member for the Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera.

My current personal research project (2016-2019) is "What is host range?", funded by the Swedish Research Council (VR). I collaborate with Niklas Janz's group studying insect-plant relationships in a subproject of my broader series of projects on insect phenotypic plasticity, exploring the considerable environmental effects that the host plants have on the fitness of insects and potential links to speciation. In my research as a whole I strive for a synthesis between the host plant work and the other subprojects, which deal with areas such as effects of temperature and photoperiod on insect life histories and life cycles, connections to sexual selection, and the effects of phenotypic plasticity on speciation and extinction processes. Phylogenetic analysis is an important tool for such questions, and for this reason I am also very interested in butterfly systematics, an area in which I collaborate with Niklas Wahlberg. I'm a firm believer in the strength of combining insights from phylogenetic and experimental studies, and my projects always include both approaches.

I was one of the Principal Investigators on the Stockholm University strategic research programme EkoKlim, on the effects of climate on biodiversity and ecosystem services, and a member of the steering group. I also lead the large-scale project "Insect life cycle genomics and adaptatiion in the wild (2013-2017) funded by the Knut & Alice Wallenberg Foundation and VR.

Link to personal website and publications



Projects

What is host range?
01/01/2016 - 31/12/2019

Interactions between parasites and their hosts are omnipresent, and their ecological importance can hardly be overstated. Understanding how they evolve and how the host range of parasites is determined is therefore a crucial goal in ecology and evolutionary biology. It is also...


Insect life cycle genomics and adaptation in the wild
01/01/2013 - 31/12/2017
KAN INSEKTERS GENER GE LEDTRÅDAR TILL ANPASSNINGENS GÅTA? Ända sedan Darwin och Wallace föreslog att levande organismer är produkter av en evolutionär process, där det naturliga urvalet har anpassat dem till sina miljöer, har evolutionsbi...

Insect life cycle genomics and adaptation in the wild
01/01/2013 - 31/12/2017

Svensk sammanfattning

Ända sedan Darwin och Wallace föreslog att levande organismer är produkter av en evolutionär process, där det naturliga urvalet har anpassat dem till sina miljöer, har evolutionsbiologer försö...


Evolution of insect host plant utilization and life history: a hierarchical approach
01/01/2012 - 31/12/2014
Insect host plant utilization is a major research area in evolutionary biology, but also in applied biology because of the great ecological and economical importance of such associations. The overall goals of the project are to illuminate how host plant utilization and associated...

Evolution of insect host plant utilization: the comma butterfly as a model organism
01/01/2009 - 31/12/2011
Phytophagous insects make up a large proportion of all living organisms and are of key importance for many other groups of organisms as well. For this reason, insect host plant utilization is a major research area in evolutionary biology, but also in applied biology because of th...


Collaborators


Last updated on 2017-16-06 at 11:14